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inc kid in Katwalk Kids Fashion Magazine
June 23, 2020

inc kid in Katwalk Kids Fashion Magazine

We are very excited to be featured in the latest issue of Katwalk Kids Fashion Magazine.

Very much aligned with our principles, Katwalk Kids Fashion Magazine promotes inclusion and diversity within the children’s modelling industry, whilst also supporting the world’s most popular children’s models. It was started off the back of a charity founded in 2016, which supports kids with Autism and other diagnosis. 

Founder Danielle Trask, says 'after experiencing the difficulties that disability and ill health of your child first hand

We are very excited to be featured in the latest issue of Katwalk Kids Fashion Magazine.

Very much aligned with our principles, Katwalk Kids Fashion Magazine promotes inclusion and diversity within the children’s modelling industry, whilst also supporting the world’s most popular children’s models. It was started off the back of a charity founded in 2016, which supports kids with Autism and other diagnosis. 

Founder Danielle Trask, says 'after experiencing the difficulties that disability and ill health of your child first hand can have it made me realise how much that acceptance and understanding is needed and what a difference that can have on children’s and their families lives. Especially their mental health. The idea for Katwalk for Kids came along and we had our second year of the charity in 2018. Children of all ages and abilities are encouraged to be part of our event, from those who are successful models to our very special little girl in her wheelchair. We are sponsored by local and international designers and businesses. The joy and happiness on the faces of the all the kids when they get to walk down the catwalk is something that melts the hearts of everyone involved. They feel valued, have a sense of belonging, enjoy meeting new friends and just being the star for a day! Every ounce of work that goes in to the show is worth what they get from it!'

The magazine is a product of the ideals and an effort to make a difference .

https://katwalkkidsfashionmagazine.com

 

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Inclusive styling tips by Tanya Ganas, founder of Style Aide
June 09, 2020

Inclusive styling tips by Tanya Ganas, founder of Style Aide

We love collaborating with like minded and inclusive brands, so when we discovered inclusive stylist, Style Aide we were immediately inspired by their work! We invited founder Tanya Ganas (ex-National Head Stylist at Scanlan Theodore) to share her story with our community and to/ provide some inclusive styling tips for dressing kids!

Check it out...

 

Style Aide was inspired by my 11 year old daughter, who is wonderfully neurodivergent! For her, tags, seams and itchy fabrics are amongst a few sensory sensitivities that make dressing each day a stressful exercise. 

I want my girls to grow up in a world that celebrates diversity, to understand there is no such thing as perfect and to recognise that real beauty comes from a kind and compassionate heart. I also want them to know that actions speak louder than words, which is why I created Style Aide, a unique personal styling service for individuals with disability! 

After 15 years of personal styling, it was time to be the change!  My vision is to smash stereotypes and prove that disability has no bearing on your sense of style!!

Style Aide responds to the frustrations and challenges experienced by people with disability when shopping and with limited stylish options available, brands like Inc Kid have been a game changer in rewriting the narrative around adaptive fashion!! 

 

Here are my top tips for curating a perfect wardrobe for your kids:

  • For active kids who love getting their hands and knees dirty, choose darker neutrals over light! Buy wardrobe staples in neutral tones such as black, navy, denim, grey & white as they will pair easily with bold coloured items and prints. 
  • Layering for fashion not just for function - Pair basics back with a denim waistcoat (add some cool badges), a sleeveless long line cardigan or a bold puffa vest/ jacket to elevate an outfit. A functional accessory like a cable knit beanie, tasselled scarf or a quirky backpack can also inject colour and a whole new level of spunk! 
  • Quality over quantity - The skin is our biggest organ so try to opt for natural fabrics where possible. Organic cotton contains less harmful chemicals than regular cotton and is also more sustainable to produce. Pre-wash all clothing before first use to remove any substances that may irritate sensitive skin. 
  • Functionality – Clothing that is easy to get on and off builds independence, confidence and self-esteem – winning!  
  • Curate a wardrobe that reflects your child’s personality and lifestyle - There is no point in having a wardrobe full of delicate clothes if your child likes climbing trees and jumping in muddy puddles!
  • Size up – Kids grow so fast, go up a size so they can wear their clothes for as long as possible. Use soft hair ties on each wrist (pucker the fabric to conceal) to keep long sleeves from slipping down.
  • Let your kids be in control of their own style by involving them in the process. Keep discussions open when kids choose gendered styles and try not to define who they are with their clothes, fashion should always be fun. 

To understand more about how Style Aide’s services sit within the eligibility of your NDIS plan visit www.styleaide.com.au 

All customers of Style Aide, will receive an exclusive discount to inc kid. 

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Do you struggle explaining inclusion to your kid?
June 03, 2020

Do you struggle explaining inclusion to your kid?

Is your kid starting to ask questions about why they are different?

Sometimes words alone are not enough. We were introduced to this invaluable kids picture book 'No Such Thing As Normal', written by Megan DeJarnett. The book is not only beautifully illustrated, it includes so many different characters with diverse needs for your kid to get acquainted with. Most importantly, it teaches diversity, collaboration, inclusion and friendship. 

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Keeley's cause- Focusing on the ability
May 25, 2020

Keeley's cause- Focusing on the ability

Keeley's cause - focusing on the ability

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Kidspot article: The day he finally learnt to take his jumper off... we all burst into tears
May 21, 2020

Kidspot article: The day he finally learnt to take his jumper off... we all burst into tears

About 12 months ago one of his OT's preferences was purely independent dressing. He really struggled with that."

"When I saw the inc kid jumpers with the bigger necks on Instagram, I said, 'yes we need to get one of those, we need to trial it!'," Casey said.

"At first he couldn't put it on... so I said 'how about you try and take it off?' and then he did. Everyone cried, we were all so happy for him."

When his dad came home, Will showed off his new trick again and gained the confidence he needed to move on to try other things.

"It's also led to other clothes," said Casey. "He's now able to take off other jumpers and other shirts as well, but before he couldn't."

Will also wears an AFO (ankle foot orthotic) and an SMO (supra-malleolarorthotic) to help him walk, but luckily inc kid's jeans are also easy for Will to pull up himself!

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Therapists and families made inc kid happen
May 20, 2020

Therapists and families made inc kid happen

Setting self dressing goals for ourselves, even before inc kid was born - were were consulting with our therapists on features for adaptive clothing for our own needs. Loops sewn into pants, chunky pulls on zips and the like. So it was a no brainer that our therapists would be involved in product development once we eventually took the dive into creating inc kid. 

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Inclusion and adaptive clothing
May 07, 2020

Meet Inclusion Ambassador, Emily Prior

Emily is a super talented model actor and activist. She is an inclusion ambassador and has challenged the advertising industry to include people with disability.

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